Status: Non-Statutory

Job title: Assistant Head

Nominated prime author: Rae Parker

Policy to be implemented by: All Staff

Version date: October 2020

Review period: 1 year

Date approved: 10th December 2020

 

Within this policy, the term ‘Headteacher’ includes ‘Head of Primary’ and ‘Head of Secondary’. The  term ‘Deputy

PSHE (Personal, Social, Health Education) Policy 

(including Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health  Education, statutory from September 2020) 

Tiverton High School 

Date of policy October 2020 

Member of staff responsible 

Rae Parker 

Review date 

October 2021 

 

Context

All schools must provide a curriculum that is broadly based, balanced and meets the needs of all  pupils. Under section 78 of the Education Act 2002 and the Academies Act 2010, a PSHE curriculum:  Promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the  school and of society, and  

  • Prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later  life.  

PSHE 

At Tiverton High School, we teach Personal, Social, Health Education as a whole-school approach to  underpin students’ development as people and because we believe that this also supports their  learning capacity. 

We are using the Jigsaw scheme of learning. This provides a programme which offers us a  comprehensive, carefully thought-through Scheme of Work bringing consistency and progression to  our students’ learning in this vital curriculum area. 

The overview of the programme can be seen on the school website. 

This also supports the “Personal Development” and “Behaviour and Attitude” aspects required  under the Ofsted Inspection Framework, as well as significantly contributing to the school’s  Safeguarding and Equality Duties, the Government’s British Values agenda and the SMSC (Spiritual,  Moral, Social, Cultural) development opportunities provided for our young people. 

Statutory RSE and Health Education 

“The Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education (England)  Regulations 2019, made under sections 34 and 35 of the Children and Social Work Act 2017, make  Relationships and Sex Education compulsory for all pupils receiving secondary education… They also  make Health Education compulsory in all schools except independent schools. Personal, Social,  Health and Economic Education (PSHE) continues to be compulsory in independent schools.” DfE Guidance p.8. 

“Today’s children and young people are growing up in an increasingly complex world and living their  lives seamlessly on and offline. This presents many positive and exciting opportunities, but also  challenges and risks. In this environment, children and young people need to know how to be safe  and healthy, and how to manage their academic, personal and social lives in a positive way.”

“This is why we have made Relationships Education compulsory in all primary schools in England and  Relationships and Sex Education compulsory in all secondary schools, as well as making Health  Education compulsory in all state-funded schools.” 

“In primary schools, we want the subjects to put in place the key building blocks of healthy,  respectful relationships, focusing on family and friendships, in all contexts, including online. This will  sit alongside the essential understanding of how to be healthy. At secondary, teaching will build on  the knowledge acquired at primaryand develop further pupils’ understanding of health, with an  increased focus on risk areas such as drugs and alcohol, as well as introducing knowledge about  intimate rlationships and sex.” 

“These subjects represent a huge opportunity to help our children and young people develop. The  knowledge and attributes gained will support their own, and others’ wellbeing and attainment and  help young people to become successful and happy adults who make a meaningful contribution to  society.” 

Secretary of State Foreword, DfE Guidance 2019 p.4-5. 

“Schools are free to determine how to deliver the content set out in the DfE guidance 2019 in the  context of a broad and balanced curriculum. Effective teaching in these subjects will ensure that  core knowledge is broken down into units of manageable size and communicated clearly to pupils, in  a carefully sequenced way, within a planned programme of lessons.” 

DfE Guidance p.8 

“All schools must have in place a written policy for Relationships and Sex Education.” DfE Guidance p.11. 

At THS we value PSHE as a way to support students’ development as human beings, to enable them  to understand and respect who they are, to empower them with a voice and to equip them for life  and learning. 

We include the statutory Relationships , Sex and Health Education within our whole-school PSHE  Programme. 

To ensure progression and a spiral curriculum, we use Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, as our  chosen teaching and learning programme and tailor it to our students’ needs. The mapping  document, ‘Jigsaw 11-16 and statutory RSE and Health Education’, shows exactly how Jigsaw and ,  therefore, our school, meets the statutory RSE and Health Education requirements.  

This programme’s complimentary update policy ensures we are always using the most up-to-date  teaching materials and that our teachers are well-supported. 

Our PSHE policy is informed by existing DfE guidance: 

  • Keeping Children Safe in Education (statutory guidance)  
  • Respectful School Communities: Self Review and Signposting Tool (a tool to  support a whole school approach that promotes respect and discipline)  Behaviour and Discipline in Schools (advice for schools, including advice for  appropriate behaviour between pupils)  
  • Equality Act 2010 and schools  
  • SEND code of practice: 0 to 25 years (statutory guidance)  
  • Alternative Provision (statutory guidance) 
  • Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools (advice for schools)  Preventing and Tackling Bullying (advice for schools, including advice on  cyberbullying)  
  • Sexual violence and sexual harassment between children in schools (advice  for schools)  
  • The Equality and Human Rights Commission Advice and Guidance (provides  advice on avoiding discrimination in a variety of educational contexts)  Promoting Fundamental British Values as part of SMSC in schools (guidance  for maintained schools on promoting basic important British values as part of  pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC)  
  • SMSC requirements for independent schools (guidance for independent  schools on how they should support pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural  development).  

The Jigsaw Programme is aligned to the PSHE Association Programmes of Study for PSHE (mapping  document available on the Community Area of www.jigsawpshe.com) and aligned to the definitions  of Relationships and Sex Education offered by the Sex Education Forum (National Children’s Bureau,  April 2020). 

What do we teach when and who teaches it? 

Tutors are delivering the content to their tutees. We feel that tutors are the best placed staff to  delive this progam as tutors know their students needs. Known, cared for and understood.  

Whole-school approach 

The Jigsaw Programme covers all areas of PSHE for the secondary phase including statutory RSE and  Health Education. The table below gives the learning theme of each of the six Puzzles (units) and  these are taught across the school; the learning deepens and broadens every year. 

Puzzle (Unit) Content 

Being Me in My World 

Celebrating  

Difference 

Includes understanding my own identity and how I fit well in  the class, school and global community. Jigsaw Charter  established. 

Includes anti-bullying (cyber and homophobic bullying  included) and understanding difference, Equality Act 

Dreams and Goals Includes goal-setting, aspirations, who do I want to become  and what would I like to do for work and to contribute to society 

Healthy Me Includes drugs and alcohol education, self-esteem and  confidence as well as healthy lifestyle choices, sleep, nutrition,  rest and exercise 

Relationships Includes understanding friendship, family, intimate  relationships and other relationships, conflict resolution and communication skills, bereavement and loss

Changing Me Includes Relationships and Sex Education in the context of  coping positively with change 

At THS we allocate 30 minutes of PSHE each week in order to teach the PSHE knowledge and skills in  a developmental and age-appropriate way. We also have two development days where we are able  to deliver experiences for providers outside of school to share their experiences. We also have  specaist staff teaching the more sensitive aspects of healthy me and relationships. 

These explicit lessons are reinforced and enhanced in many ways:  

  • assemblies and collective worship,  
  • praise and reward system,  
  • Learning Charter,  
  • through relationships student to student, adult to student and adult to adult across the  school.  
  • We aim to ‘live’ what is learnt and apply it to everyday situations in the school community. Class tutors deliver the weekly lessons. 
  • Each lesson has a 30 minute timetabled slot each week. 

At THS we allocate 30 minutes of PSHE each week in order to teach the PSHE knowledge and skills in  a developmental and age-appropriate way. We also have two development days where we are able  to deliver experiences for providers outside of school to share their experiences. We also have  specaist staff teaching the more sensitive aspects of healthy me and relationships. 

These explicit lessons are reinforced and enhanced in many ways:  

  • assemblies and collective worship,  
  • praise and reward system,  
  • Learning Charter,  
  • through relationships student to student, adult to student and adult to adult across the school.  
  • We aim to ‘live’ what is learnt and apply it to everyday situations in the school community.
  • Class tutors deliver the weekly lessons. 
  • Each lesson has a 30 minute timetabled slot each week. 

Relationships and Sex Education

“The aim of RSE is to give young people the information they need to help them develop healthy,  nurturing relationships of all kinds, not just intimate relationships. It should enable them to know  what a healthy relationship looks like…it should also cover contraception, developing intimate  relationships and resisting pressure to have sex (and not applying pressure). It should teach what is  acceptable and unacceptable behaviour in relationships… 

Effective RSE also supports people, throughout life, to develop safe, fulfilling and healthy sexual  relationships, at the appropriate time. 

RSE should provide clear progression from what is taught in primary school in Relationships  Education. 

Pupils should understand the benefits of healthy relationships to their mental wellbeing and self respect.” DfE Guidance page 25 

“In teaching Relationships Education and RSE, schools should ensure that the needs of all pupils are  appropriately met, and that all pupils understand the importance of equality and respect. Schools  must ensure they comply with the relevant provisions of The Equality Act 2010 under which sexual  orientation and gender reassignment are amongst the protected characteristics… 

We expect all pupils to have been taught LGBT content at a timely point as part of this area of the  curriculum.” DfE Guidance page 15 

The Sex Education Forum offers the following definitions: 

“Sex education is learning about the physical, social, legal and emotional aspects of human sexuality  and behaviour, including human reproduction. This includes conception and contraception, safer  sex, sexually transmitted infections and sexual health.”

“Relationships education is learning about the physical, social, legal and emotional aspects of human  relationships including friendships, intimate, sexual and committed relationships and family life.  Relationships education supports children to be safe, happy and healthy in their interactions with  others now and in the future.” 

Sex Education Forum, 2020 

What does the DfE statutory guidance on Relationships Education expect young people to know by  the time they leave secondary school? 

RSE in secondary schools will cover ‘Families’, ‘Respectful relationships including friendships’, ‘Online  and media’, ‘Being safe’ and ‘Intimate sexual relationships, including sexual health’. 

The expected outcomes for each of these elements can be found further on in this policy. The way  the Jigsaw Programme covers these is explained in the mapping document, ‘Jigsaw 11-16 and  Statutory RSE and Health Education’. 

It is important to explain that whilst the Relationships Puzzle (unit) in Jigsaw covers most of the  statutory Relationships Education, the Changing Me Puzzle covers much of the Sex Education and  the Healthy Me Puzzle covers much of the Health Education, some of the outcomes are also taught  elsewhere in Jigsaw. This holistic approach ensures the learning is reinforced through the year and  across the curriculum. 

Health Education

“It is important that the starting point for health and wellbeing education should be a focus on  enabling pupils to make well-informed, positive choices for themselves.” 

DfE Guidance page 35. 

What does the DfE statutory guidance on Health Education expect young people to know by the  time they leave secondary school? 

Health Education in secondary schools will cover ‘Mental wellbeing’, ‘Internet safety and harms’,  Physical health and fitness’, Healthy eating’, ‘Drugs, alcohol and tobacco’, ‘Health and prevention’,  ‘Basic First Aid’, ‘Changing adolescent body’. 

The expected outcomes for each of these elements can be found further on in this policy. The way  the Jigsaw Programme covers these is explained in the mapping document, ‘Jigsaw 11-16 and  Statutory RSE and Health Education’. 

It is important to explain that whilst the Healthy Me Puzzle (unit) in Jigsaw covers most of the  statutory Health Education, some of the outcomes are taught elsewhere in Jigsaw, e.g. emotional  and mental health is nurtured every lesson through mindfulness practice and respect is enhanced  through the use of the Jigsaw Charter. 

Again, the mapping document shows transparently how the Jigsaw whole-school approach spirals  the learning and meets all statutory requirements and more. 

Sex Education

The DfE Guidance 2019 integrates Relationships and Sex Education at secondary school level. 

Most of the DfE outcomes relating to Sex Education sit withing the ‘Intimate and sexual  relationships, including sexual health’ section of the guidance and include aspects like:

  • the facts about reproductive health… 
  • the facts about the full range of contraceptive choices … 
  • how the different sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS, are  transmitted… 
  • how to get further advice… 
  • consent and the law 

DfE Guidance page29. 

At Tiverton High School we agree with the Sex Education Forum definition of Sex Education (as  above). 

The Jigsaw PSHE Programme also reflects this, making it possible for us to identify which lessons  specifically address these aspects of learning, thereby making it straightforward for us to  communicate this to parents/carers in relation to their right to request to withdraw their children  from Sex Education. 

The grid below shows which lessons cover which aspects of the DfE outcomes… Parents’ right to request their child be withdrawn from Sex Education 

“Parents have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from some or all of sex education  delivered as part of statutory RSE… 

… except in exceptional circumstances, the school should respect the parents’ request to withdraw  the child, up to and until three terms before the child turns 16. After that point, if the child wishes to  receive sex education rather than be withdrawn, the school should make arrangements to provide  the child with sex education during one of those Terms”. 

DfE Guidance pages 17/18. 

Should parents wish to discuss withdrawing their child from Sex Education, they are advised to…. 

Monitoring and Review 

The Curriculum Committee of the governing body monitors this policy on an annual basis. This  committee reports its findings and recommendations to the full governing body, as necessary, if the  policy needs modification. The Curriculum Committee gives serious consideration to any comments  from parents about the PSHE (RSHE) programme, and makes a record of all such comments.  Governors scrutinise and ratify teaching materials to check they are in accordance with the school’s  ethos.  

Inclusion and SEND 

At THS we pride ourselves on our inclusive policy and on how we make provision for all stduents’  needs. 

PSHE is differentiated and personalised by….. 

Equality 

This policy will inform the school’s Equalities Policy 

The DfE Guidance 2019 (p.15) states, “Schools should ensure that the needs of all pupils are  appropriately met, and that all pupils understand the importance of equality and respect. Schools 

must ensure they comply with the relevant provisions of the Equality Act 2010 under which sexual  orientation and gender reassignment are amongst the protected characteristics… 

At the point at which schools consider it appropriate to teach their pupils about LGBT (Lesbian, Gay,  Bisexual, Transgender), they should ensure this content is fully integrated into their programmes of  study for this area of the curriculum rather than delivered as a stand-alone unit or lesson. Schools  are free to determine how they do this, and we expect all pupils to have been taught LGBT content  at a timely point as part of this area of the curriculum”. 

At THS School we promote respect for all and value every individual student. We also respect the right of our students, their families and our staff, to hold beliefs, religious or  otherwise, and understand that sometimes these may be in tension with our approach to some  aspects of RSE and Health Education.